It Might Get Loud – An insightful and musically satisfying tribute by 3 Rock’N’Roll masters

Rarely can a film penetrate the glamorous surface of rock legends. It Might Get Loud tells the personal stories, in their own words, of three generations of electric guitar virtuosos--The Edge (U2), Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin), and Jack White (The White Stripes).

artvodMay 4, 2020

It Might Get Loud - An insightful and musically satisfying tribute by 3 Rock'N'Roll masters

Rarely can a film penetrate the glamorous surface of rock legends. It Might Get Loud tells the personal stories, in their own words, of three generations of electric guitar virtuosos–The Edge (U2), Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin), and Jack White (The White Stripes).

It reveals how each developed his unique sound and style of playing favorite instruments, guitars both found and invented. Concentrating on the artist’s musical rebellion, traveling with him to influential locations, provoking rare discussion as to how and why he writes and plays, this film lets you witness intimate moments and hear new music from each artist.

The movie revolves around a day when Jimmy Page, Jack White, and The Edge first met and sat down together to share their stories, teach and play.

The 2009 documentary It Might Get Loud, which can be Streamed on ArtVOD.com, tries to find the common chord that ties together guitarists of different genres and generations but quickly goes flat and is ultimately a discordant mess.

The film compares their different backgrounds, approaches and output, and then puts them on a soundstage together, guitars in hand, in the hopes of generating some divine musical collaboration or illuminating insight into the artistic process and the role of the electric guitar in the creation of transcendent rock n’ roll.

While Jimmy Page is one of rock’s first great electric guitar virtuosos, The Edge was inspired by the entry-level musicianship of punk, and Jack White celebrates a reactionary musical primitivism.

At the same time, both Led Zeppelin and U2 were masters of grandiosity, creating music so big it only sounded right in sports arenas, and despite a 31-year age difference, Page and White cite the same blues and early rock n’ roll pioneers as inspiration.

We get the basic overview of each of their approaches to the electric guitar, hear about their favorite gear, but not enough to explain its importance to non-musicians, nor please hardcore fans or guitarists themselves.

Where The Edge’s guitar work is a 3-D web of different sounds, making the simplest of guitar figures sound rich and complex, he’s a rather low-energy presence on camera, however affable.

White is alternately amusing and annoying, pontificating about his primitive musical impulses, while showing off an expensive custom made guitar with a built in microphone, or bragging about his use of plastic pawn shop guitars, guitars which are now unaffordable to most working musicians thanks to his popularization of them.

[Read the full article on Decider.com]

Categories

Leave a comment

Name *
Add a display name
Email *
Your email address will not be published
Website